The photographs that changed the world

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The photographs that changed the world KingConn 12/19/05 9:51 AM
Taken by Kevin Carter in the village of Ayod during the Sudan famine crisis of a small, starving Sudanese child being stalked by a vulture.
The photograph won Carter a Nobel Prize in 1994
He committed suicide that same year

Last updated 11/15/2007
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 1/22/06 2:39 PM
EDIT: The placemark has been changed to a collection

Attatched is a collection of photographs that have had a major impact on the world. Whether it be a murder or a speech, each of these photos has affected the world in one way or another.
Re: The photographs that shook the world TommyAfrika 1/23/06 9:34 AM
Ryan, this is an excellent post. Thanks.
Re: The photographs that shook the world BeadieJay 1/23/06 11:56 AM
I agree, this is first rate
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Re: The photographs that shook the world Frank_McVey 1/23/06 1:00 PM
What a great post, Ryan - I must have missed it first time round. Let's have some more!

Cheers

Frank
Re: The photographs that shook the world contour 1/23/06 1:05 PM
Google Earth stops... it doesn't fly to Sudan.
I can't see anything in reference to pictures or the story.
I know I must be missing the boat here...sorry.
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 1/27/06 5:21 PM
The collection has been updated with a few new pictures.

Enjoy
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mezaial 2/3/06 10:51 AM
I really like this collection of images, but have spotted several small errors I thought you might want to know about (Nothing serious really)

Firstly, 'Lee Harvey Oswalt' (Small spelling error, I told you nothing serious).

Secondly, You Wikipedia link for the 'Kent State Massacre' actually links to the "I have a dream" page.
(For those that are interested, a really detailed post about the Kent State Massacre can be found here.)

Thirdly, Your 'Elian Gonzalez' wiki page does not exist. See what I mean here. You should use this link instead.

Fourthly, Your 'Trang Bang, Vietnam' wiki page does not exist. See what I mean here. You should use this link instead.

Fifthly, Your 'Thich Quang Duc' wiki page does not exist. See what I mean here. You should use this link instead.

And finally, (because I just noticed it) in 'VJ Day Kiss' you fail to reveil the name of Greta Friedman as the second possibility for the woman in the photograph.

I dont mean to pick faults but this seems like such a good project, it would be a shame for it not to be accurate.
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Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/4/06 6:19 AM
Okay.

I've used you're suggestions and the collection has been edited
Enjoy
Re: The photographs that shook the world AdrianM 2/5/06 12:33 AM
Thanks Ryan, excellent post.

The Massacre of My Lai really pissed me off. Seeing infants dead because of an American soldier really hits home as a dad.
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mezaial 2/5/06 10:20 AM
Great job.

Except for Lee Harvey Oswald is spelt with a D not a T at the end. In my last post I was highlighting your error, not telling you how it is meant to be spelled. I guess thats my fault really. Otherwise nice work.

If you dont mind I can think of another photo which should be in your collection. It is a photograph taken shortly after General Pattons troops liberated Buchenwald Concentration Camp in 1945.

It wasn't until the ending days of WWII that the full horror of what had occured at these camps came to light. Photographs like these showing jewish prisoners living amongs piles of corpses, really struck a chord with everybody who saw them as to the true extent of how evil the Nazi regime had become.

These are definately photograph's that changed the world.

A GE Placemark for Buchenwald can be found here.
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/5/06 10:34 AM
Thanks for the corrections!
Your photo has been added to the collection.
If anyone else has a photo they'd like to contribute, either PM me or post links to it on the thread.

Check the original file.
Re: The photographs that shook the world wernerstreuer 2/5/06 10:43 AM
And he, Carter, is mentioned in the book "Bang Bang Club" about journalism during the period of apartheid in SA. Carter was a member of the 4 persons war-journalists club.

recommend it greatly. The book was also recommended by bishop Tutu!!!!
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mezaial 2/6/06 12:24 PM
I can think of a whole bunch of images that should rightfully be in your collection. The problem is that I either can't find a copy of the image that I am thinking of, or I do not know the exact location it was taken so it can be placemarked. For now I will add those that I do know, and I need to do some further research on those I dont.

I also think it is only fair that you give credit to the photographer/agency that owns that image. (I can help you with this if you want - PM me)

The Assassination Martin Luther King, Jr.


Joseph Louw (Life Magazine/PPCM)

This image was taken by South African documentary photographer Joseph Louw moments after the assassination of civil right's leader Martin Luther King, Jr. King was shot once through the head whilst walking along the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis. Louw, who was making a documentary about King instinctively decided to record for history the moments after Kings death. His photographs showed the positions of the people around the hotel and on the balcony, the fingers are all pointing at the direction of the shot.

Intreagingly, Nobody seams to know the identity of the man who is kneeling over Kings body or how he came to be on the balcony. It has been speculated that he was a US Secret Service agent. That is why some people still believe that James Earl Ray was not the brains behind the shooting and that there was a much bigger conspiracy.

Wikipedia Page for Martin Luther King, Jr.

A placemark for the Lorraine Hotel can be found here.
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mezaial 2/17/06 7:57 AM
The Ruth Snyder Execution

This is the first stolen tabloid image of the 20th century, and also the most famous because it happens to be the only photograph ever to be taken of a state sanctioned execution. This image is still controversial to this very day because firstly the image was obtained unlawfully and secondly because the subject matter of the image was a Woman.


Thomas Howard (Daily News, L.P.)

The subject of the photograph is Ruth Snyder who together with her lover Judd Gray were executed on the 12th January 1928 by Electrocution at Sing Sing prison in New York. Snyder and Grey were tried and convicted of the murder of Ruth Snyders husband Alfred Snyder.

For more information about Ruth Snyders crimes, please look here.

Photographers are not permitted into executions in the United States, so the New York Daily News hired photographer Thomas Howard and brought him down from Washington because he wasn't known to the Prison Warders or Journalists in the New York area.

Passing himself of as a writer, Howard arrived early to get the best seat in the house. Straped to his left ankle was a concealed minature camera. the camera had a single photographic plate and was linked by cable to the shutter release that was concealed within his jacket. When Snyders body shook from the first jolt, Howard depressed the shutter release and exposing the plate. During the second jolt he pressed again producing a feeling of movement in the final image.



After the photograph was published on the front page with just the simple banner headline "DEAD!", Howard became famous practically overnight. He recieved a large bonus from the paper and went on to become the head of photography for the White House


Wikipedia page for Ruth Snyder
Wikipedia page for Sing Sing Prison
A GE placemark for Sing Sing Prison can be found here.
Re: The photographs that shook the world tekgergedan 2/17/06 3:17 PM
How did I miss this post? Excellent...

Mezaial, thank you for that you brought it to the top of the forum back.
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Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/18/06 9:48 AM
UPDATE:

2 pictures have been added to the collection.

Keep the pictures coming!
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/19/06 9:48 AM
UPDATE:

A new picture has been added.

Also added are ownership IDs for many photographs and some pictures now have new titles.
Most of this is courtesy of Mezaial.
Thanks Mezaial 2/19/06 10:51 AM
Quote:

Mezaial, thank you for that you brought it to the top of the forum back.



Quote:

Also added are ownership IDs for many photographs and some pictures now have new titles.
Most of this is courtesy of Mezaial.




Gee shucks, it was nothing, glad to have helped.

All in all it makes the project more complete to have this info.

Thanks for all the credit. It is always nice to know your efforts are appreciated.
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mezaial 2/19/06 2:45 PM
The Chernobyl Disaster


Igor Kostin (Igor Kostin/Reuters)

This image depicts the horrific working condition's of the Liquidator's. 600,000 men of the soviet armed forces who were sent in to work shifts to clear the debris from the roof of the Chernobyl-4 reactor. Because of the extreme levels of radiation these men had to work in eight man teams for no more than 40 seconds. This meant that these men had to run up the stairs to the roof wearing lead suits, pick up a shovelfull of debris and heave it into the huge gaping hole in the roof where Reactor No.4 once stood. They would then have to run back down the stairs again remembering to take their shovels with them. Usually most of these men only had enough time to heave just one shovelfull.

Igor Kostin a photographer for the Novosti Agency decided to accompany a group of Liquidators onto the roof of Unit 4. But all his photos came out black, so after lead-lining his camera and modifying his film he returned to the roof five more times in one week, staying two to three minutes at a time. He later said that he did it so "The sacrifice of these men sould never be forgotten". For years afterwards he has continued to photograph everything about this incident with an obsessive eye for detail including eight-legged colts, mutated apples and trees, stillborn babies with webbed fingers emering from their shoulders. Babies without arms or legs, children with Thyroid cancer (800 cases have been recorded by Kostin), Liquidators suffering from leukemia (60,000 have already died). As Kostin once said "I record everything, then it's up to the Scientists"

For his efforts Kostin recieved the World Press Photo award in 1997. Unfortunately he also recieved five times the accepted dose of radiation and has had to have several Thyroid operations over the years. As far as I know he is still alive and well and living in Kiev.

I seem to remember reading somewhere that Igor Kostin still owns all his negatives, but the image I have chosen, which I think was titled "The Liquidators" is now owned by Reuters. I'll try to confirm this for you.

Wikipedia page for Chernobyl
Wikipedia page for Igor Kostin
GUARDIAN: Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster - In Pictures - Contains the incredible images by Igor Kostin
BBC NEWS: On This Day - 28th April 1986 - The BBC news report on the incident (includes video's)

A GE placemark for Chernobyl can be found here.

I'd just like to say that for me, what this man did, in repeatedly placing himself in such serious personal danger just to document the work of these incredible heroes makes Igor Kostin and absolute legend in my eyes. I mean, I dont know about you, but if I was there and I saw the explosion, and I knew it was a nuclear power plant. I'd be No questions asked.
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/19/06 3:31 PM
Added.....

Start sending me PMs for your ideas from now on. I'd rather not give away the contents of the collection before some one even opens it.
Re: The photographs that shook the world IanUK 2/20/06 6:37 AM
I was rather late finding this thread!

Congrats on a superb post. Some of those photos are breath taking.


5 stars.
Re: The photographs that shook the world Anonymous 2/20/06 7:48 AM
Thanks Ryan, great post but We don't know why Kevin Carter commited suicide
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/20/06 6:58 PM
While it is impossible to know exactly why Carter chose to take his life, many clues can be taken from his suicide note.

"depressed ... without phone ... money for rent ... money for child support ... money for debts ... money!!! ... I am haunted by the vivid memories of killings & corpses & anger & pain ... of starving or wounded children, of trigger-happy madmen, often police, of killer executioners..." And then this: "I have gone to join Ken if I am that lucky."

More on Carter
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/26/06 11:45 AM
UPDATE:

An entire new folder has been added.
The Pulitzer Prize awards for photography.
This took me quite some time to finish.
So you'd better enjoy it!

Images are hosted by Photobucket, loading time may vary.
Re: The placemarks that shook the world Mathieu_Dugelay 3/7/06 6:43 PM
Dear Ryan,
I'm addicted to GE since almost one year now. Your placemark is the best ever seen during this time, instructive, useful, with all necessary external sources....

It should be offered when downloading GE so that to prove this software is also a marvellous historic tool !

Five stars !

Yours faithfully from France and Switzerland
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 3/11/06 9:26 AM
A few more pictures have been added for you to look at.

If anyone knows what happened to Passoria, NJ, please tell me.
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 3/19/06 3:54 PM
A few more have been added
Re: The photographs that shook the world philverney 3/27/06 12:18 PM
Hi Ryan, here's the exact house where the Elian Gonzalez incident took place.

The house is located at 2319 NW 2nd Street in Miami and has since become a shrine to the incident.

Enjoy!
Cheers,
Phil, UK

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Re: The photographs that shook the world Anonymous 3/27/06 1:11 PM
philverney you're in right path 2319 NW 2nd Street in Miami there incident took place
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 4/5/06 1:47 PM
Thanks Phil!
It's been a long time since I've checked this thread, so I never knew you posted this!
I added two new placemarks to celebrate!
Hooray!

And I'm about to start a project that will make a great addition to the collection, so look out!

-Ryan
Re: The photographs that shook the world PureVodka 4/6/06 8:44 PM
One of the best posts i ever seen here. Graet work RyanConn.
And of course, a great thank you .
Re: The photographs that shook the world mdg910 4/17/06 1:00 PM
Absolutly.I agree
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 4/21/06 7:57 PM
Slight change in some of the information

Thank you so much for your kind words!
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 4/22/06 3:14 PM
Part of the folder "Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography" has been added

If anyone has information on these photos, please contact me
Re: The photographs that changed the world RyanThompson 6/14/06 10:32 PM
As for Columbine, there are already three other placemarkers for this
Re: The photographs that changed the world Anonymous 6/24/06 6:37 AM
This is a very entertaining and informative post. Thank you.

I was surprized that none of the Abu Grahib photographs made it into the list. Admittedly none of them won a Pulitzer Prize, but they certainly shook the world.

Peace
Re: The photographs - Thich Quang Duc - fixed Brightsun 7/7/06 10:58 AM
Thích Quang Duc

This location is WRONG & should have been 2.3 km to the North East direction (see the correction attached)

The street intersection is "Phan Dinh Phung" (north-south) with "Le Van Duyet" (east-west). After 1975, the names have been changed to "Nguyen Dinh Chieu" and "Cach Mang Thang Tam" consequently.
Re: The photographs - Vietnamese execution - fixed Brightsun 7/7/06 11:37 AM
The location of "Vietnamese Execution" is wrong. See the correct one (attached).

This historic event happened only about 20 meters from my childhood house.
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 7/31/06 4:32 PM
Updated with one new picture added
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 8/11/06 11:46 AM
Updated with a few new photos
Al Dura (was Re: photos that changed the world) pashute 10/24/06 5:32 PM
a. "Al dura" is not in correct location. It happended at Netzarim, several km away.
b. No mention of the (now evacuated) settlements there, and hundreds of deliberately point blank targeted Jewish babies, children and families, killed and injured there (which was the reason for the crossfire in the first place).
c. This image is under scrutiny by several sources, in context of the movie showing preparations for a forgery.
d. Is Google Earth a political battlefield?
Re: The photographs that changed the world Osama_Ziad_Alkayed 11/2/06 6:50 AM
One of the best posts i ever seen.

Good work.
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 11/24/06 5:14 PM
Updated November 24.
If you have any suggestions, PM me.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Delta102 12/2/06 11:52 PM
Very well put together Ryan!
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Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 12/8/06 1:05 PM
Thanks!

Updated 12/08 with new pictures
Re: The photographs that changed the world Vasyov 12/28/06 4:40 AM
City of Krasnodar, Russia. Very old photos. Approximately 2002-2003 years. Already much does not correspond(meet) to the validity. Update them, please.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Hill 12/28/06 12:47 PM
This is where you can be of help. if you have knowledge to update or expand upon information, please add it to your reply. Posters may not visit the forum often and will not necessarily see your comment. Someone reading this thread can see additions/corrections that you have made however.
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Re: The photographs that changed the world jccj2003 1/16/07 8:03 PM
The picture of the child in Sudan may be one of the most horrific things I have ever seen. What a powerful photograph on so many levels.

Thank you for the post.
Tarawa Photo Axeman89 1/21/07 6:55 PM
The photo taken during the Battle of Tarawa is next to the wrong island (although it is the right country.) The photo is next to Banaba/Ocean Island, east of Tarawa.
Re: The photograph that changed the world RightLineC 2/23/07 4:42 PM
I think you mean, "earned Kevin the _Pulitzer_ Prize." He won the Pulitzer in the "Features" category.

The book _Capture the Moment_, ed. by C. Rubin and E. Newton, originally published in 2000, details each of the Pulitzer Prizes awarded up to its publication.

Kevin Carter's photograph, entitled "Waiting Game for Sudanese Child," was taken at a feeding station at Ayod, Sudan. The book tells us: "Carter takes his photographs, then chases the bird away. Afterward, he sits under a tree and cries. Journalists in the Sudan had been told not to touch famine victims because of the risk of transmitting disease. This is no comfort to Carter, who tells a friend, 'I'm really, really sorry I didn't pick the child up.'"

The photograph was taken March 23, 1993. Kevin Carter was found dead at the age of 33 from an apparent suicide on July 26, 1994.
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 4/4/07 10:20 AM
Updated with a few new photos.
Re: The photographs that changed the world caitm89 5/17/07 10:10 AM
this post is awesome, thank you very much! keep them coming.
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 5/25/07 9:39 PM
May 26- Broken picture links have been fixed. If any problems persist, report them to me.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Moaguten 5/29/07 1:40 PM
Great post!
A slight misplacement of the Yalta Conference.
See attachment
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 5/29/07 5:37 PM
Thanks! The placemark has been corrected.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Kurila 7/17/07 5:05 PM
Regarding Lee Oswald, firstly, location is incorrect, and the year was 1963, not 1964. Attached is the correct location for the Dallas Police Headquarters where Oswald was shot by Ruby with a brief description.
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 7/26/07 11:34 PM
I have changed the location.

This collection has been going on for over a year and a half and there are bound to be a fw broken picture links. If anyone finds any broken links, please PM me and I will fix it
Re: The photographs that changed the world KingConn 11/5/07 5:26 PM
The file has been updated with some new information.

Thanks to Jim Flick (who is in the picture "Lull in the Battle") for information regarding that specific picture
Re: The photographs that shook the world Mjunker 1/5/08 12:28 PM
Amazing that history re-writers never tell the whole story, only from the side of the 'peace loving protestors' side of the story. You never hear the side that tells of a reckless mob closing in on the National Guard, and all the violence that lead up to the incident......
Re: The photographs that shook the world KingConn 2/13/08 4:55 PM
So... are you asking for more detail?
Re: The photographs that changed the world Axeman89 8/5/08 9:42 PM
Another Tarawa-related mistake.
The photograph is misdated. The battle was fought in 1943, not '44, although it may be possible that the picture was taken two months later, in 1944.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Jayb1 10/11/08 9:08 PM
The caption on this photo says that the children were running away from American Forces.

This is WRONG.

The aircraft that dropped the napalm was a VNAF, A1E1, Skyraider. (that's Vietnamese Airforce)
There were NO American Forces in Sth. Vietnam at the time. (apart from Embassy staff)
The photo was taken in 1975 Not 1973.

The Sth Vietnamese Forces were defending their country from an illegal invasion by Nth. Vietnam. America & the Allies had left Sth. Vietnam in 1972, After the Paris Accord. Nth. Vietnam broke that Accord & invaded Sth. Vietnam in 1975.

Please, if you are going to post make sure that you have your facts correct.
Re: The photographs that changed the world Delta102 10/12/08 1:39 AM


The photo of Kim Phuc (full name Phan Thi Kim Phúc) was taken just after South Vietnamese planes bombed her village. She had only lived because she tore off her burning clothes. AP Photographer Nick Út and NBC cameraman Le Phuc Dinh filmed her and her family emerging from the village, after the air strike, running for their lives. This photo has become one of the most famous and memorable photos of Vietnam and won Nick Út the Pulitzer prize in 1972.

Link

Photo credit
Re: The photographs that changed the world PriceCollins 8/10/11 9:09 AM

A user notes:

Quote:
Placemark titled 1952: Get that N*****! The post references Oklahoma A&M. This location is Northeastern Oklahoma A&M, while Oklahoma State University in Stillwater OK is the former Oklahoma A&M. Due to the fact this subject is very racial and this particular marker is so prominent at higher altitudes (2200+ mi), I feel this error casts a very unfair light on Northeastern A&M.

Suggest your placemark at 36.87800371,-94.86647076 be moved to 36.121,-97.07 on the campus of Oklahoma State University at Stillwater.
Re: The photographs that changed the world MannyMoeJack 12/23/11 3:38 PM
I'm curious why 1949: The King of Clout, the Sultan of Swat depicts the 1932 World Series (from the description) but is titled as 1949. Does anyone have an explanation or is it a mistake? Assuming somebody who can edit it is checking, you might consider a spelling correction in that one where it says: "Babe steps back, and takes a few *****prsctice***** swings."
Not trying to nag. I think this is an excellent topic and post. Thanks for the nice work!
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