Standard YouTube License details

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Standard YouTube License details RubberDucky451 6/24/11 3:01 PM
I've recently uploaded a video with the Standard YouTube License. The video has gained a decent amount of views and it was recently featured on a television show. I received no notification and gave no permission to the TV show to use my video. Does the standard YouTube License allow television shows to exhibit my work without my express permission?
 
Link to video:
 
Re: Standard YouTube License details Mxsmanic 6/24/11 5:50 PM
When you upload the video, you have the choice of allowing the video to appear on TV or not. By default, you grant permission for this. If you don't want this to happen, you can change the video characteristics to prohibit use on TV. Look for "syndication" near the bottom of the page when you edit the video details.
Re: Standard YouTube License details paulgr 6/24/11 6:27 PM
The "TV" referred to in "Syndication" is in YT playback interfaces on TV devices like (formerly) Roku and WD "Live Hub." TV SHOWS like "Lopez Tonight" are just using the material without asking you.

To use one of my videos, a TV production company had to sign a contract with me and pay a $1,200.00 fee for 2 minutes for 1 use.
Re: Standard YouTube License details rewboss 6/25/11 5:25 AM
The standard YouTube licence is detailed in the Terms of Service, but basically you grant YouTube to broadcast your video on YouTube. Apart from that, you retain all copyright.

Unfortunately, media companies seem to think that anything they find on YouTube is fair game, and equally unfortunately, they have the sort of lawyers you wouldn't want to be up against in court. The image sharing service Twitpic recently suffered a PR setback when they amended their ToS to reflect the fact that this happens, and this was interpreted by users as "Twitpic robs you of your copyright". And unfortunately yet again, if you're in the US and you didn't register your copyright, although the TV company still (probably) broke the law, you'll not be able to claim damages and may even have to pay all your legal fees even if you do win.

I'm afraid the only thing you can do is talk to a lawyer. And although I'm not one myself, I'm afraid you'll have to be prepared for him to shrug his shoulders and say, "Well, what can you do?"